Ace Air, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Indoor Air Quality’

“How Powerful Should My Air Filter Be?”

Monday, October 22nd, 2018

white question mark on blue backgroundWhen it comes to your indoor air quality, it’s important to be aware of what factors contribute to ill health. A common misconception that many homeowners have about their HVAC systems is that the air filter within it is all they need for proper indoor air quality. This is simply not the case, though.

That air filter is there to protect the inside components of the HVAC system itself, from dust, dirt, and debris that could otherwise be allergens for you. True, the air filter does help a little for indoor air quality, but that is really not its sole purpose.

This myth about air filters can actually leave you with an air conditioner that makes your air quality worse, as you may not realize you need to change it every 1-3 months (depending on the type of air filter and the level of contaminants in your home.

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Where Do Air Quality Problems Come From?

Monday, July 30th, 2018

Sick woman blowing her nosePoor indoor air quality is not a unique problem, though it is a relatively new one. In recent decades, home construction has become tighter. This allows your HVAC systems to function as efficiently as possible, without air loss or unnecessary energy waste. This is great news for your wallet, but not so much for your indoor air quality. If air cannot get out of your home, that means neither can airborne contaminants or humidity.

When most homeowners hear the term “bad indoor air quality,” they think it’s just an inconvenience, maybe even mildly uncomfortable. However, poor indoor air quality can actually have a considerable negative impact on your health and comfort throughout the years. If you’re unsure of what to do about your indoor air quality, keep reading!

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Treating Spring Allergies from Inside Your Home

Monday, March 26th, 2018

Rear view of a young woman opening the curtains in the morningWhen it comes to improving your indoor air quality, there are a lot of factors to consider. Of course, your HVAC systems play a large role in keeping your household comfortable, but the temperature of your living space is just part of the equation. Without the right indoor air quality solutions in place, anyone in your family could find their spring allergy symptoms exacerbated.

You might be wondering, “Isn’t that what the air filter in my HVAC system is for?” This filter—the one that comes standard with your HVAC upon installation—is there to protect the inside components of that system, not your indoor air quality. It will do little to protect your family from the pollutants and contaminants and irritate the sinuses and make allergies act up. So, what can you do?

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Protect Your Home During Cold and Flu Season

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

woman-cold-thermometer-mugIf you have not yet caught the flu during this rough season, consider yourself lucky. This is one of the worst years in memory for flu hospitalizations. It’s important to take every precaution you can to protect yourself, your kids, and all the people you see every day. Remember, the young and the elderly face much greater risks than you do, and you should do whatever you can to stay safe.

The CDC recommends, “Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season.” Because the flu shot may not be 100% effective, though, you may have to take additional measures. We recommend doing everything you can to prep your home, in order to protect your family.

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4 Things to Know about Air Ducts

Monday, December 18th, 2017

duct-system-sealing-handsThe air ducts are the gateway from your home’s air conditioner and heating system to the rooms of your home. The ductwork allows air to get sucked into the system in the first place and then to be distributed throughout the home as evenly as possible—if it’s in good shape.

But the fact of the matter is that most air ducts are not. The ductwork is likely something you know little about, even in your own home, and it could be bent out of shape (figuratively or literally). This is the first topic we’ll cover in our guide to what we think homeowners should know about the air ducts.

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Worst Rooms in Your Dos Palos Home to Collect Allergens

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Your Dos Palos home can be a haven for allergens, and some rooms in particular are much worse than others . They are damp. They are warm. They often have garbage in them. These are the rooms that need especially close attention when trying to maintain air quality in your home.

Basement

First on the list is your basement. A basement is the biggest problem when it’s either unfinished or does not have and air filtration. If you have water leaks in your basement or poor insulation, it’s important to have a moisture barrier put in and have your pipes checked. If the water comes from a drainage pipe or your sewer line, repairs can be made. If it comes from excess ground water or leaks in the foundation, a sump pump or drain tile system will help remove the excess water. Either way, the wetter your basement gets, the higher the risk of mold and other contaminants becomes.

Beyond moisture, a basement tends to collect a lot of dust. After all, it is where we put many of our old and unwanted possessions, and because the furnace is often in your basement, all that damp, allergen filled air gets cycled back into your home.

Bathroom

Bathrooms are allergen havens for two reasons. They are filled with moisture, and without proper ventilation they will soon be filled with mold and mildew. Additionally, when not cleaned regularly they can house buildups of hair, skin, and other dust building residue that tend to trigger allergies.

The easiest way to handle this problem is to clean your bathroom regularly and make sure it is properly ventilated. Short of an exhaust fan in your bathroom, keep the door and windows open to help it dry faster.

Kitchen

Your kitchen produces allergens like mold and mildew due to the presence of garbage and fruit. It can also attract bugs and the dirt that accrues from people passing through constantly. Pets tend to eat in the kitchen, leaving behind dander. Additionally, plants and vegetables in the kitchen release pollen that circulates through your home to trigger additional allergies. Exhaust from cooking and smoke can also be a harmful allergen trigger.

The kitchen should be kept well ventilated and clean at all times. Check for any gaps in your insulation and have your exhaust fan and hood cleaned regularly to avoid backups of smoke or gas.

Allergens are everywhere in your home – with careful attention, however, you can stop them from affecting your family negatively.

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How Much Ventilation Do I Need for My Cressey House?

Friday, January 13th, 2012

By now you’ve probably heard how important it is to have good ventilation in your Cressey home. Especially if your home was built in the 1980s or early 1990s when ventilation issues were prevalent, you may not have enough clean air moving through your home. But, how much ventilation do you need? What is enough and if you don’t have it, how do you ensure your home is retrofitted properly?

How Much Ventilation?

Most recommendations for ventilation come from the Home Ventilation Institute, which provides a series of standards of measurement for builders and contractors retrofitting homes for better ventilation. Here are some of their recommendations and how they might apply for your home:

  • Bathroom – Small bathrooms (less than 100 sq. ft) need 1 CFM per square foot of bathroom. The number goes up for each fixture if you have a large bathroom.
  • Kitchens – Your kitchen range needs at least 100 CFM if against the wall and upwards of 150 CFM if on an island.
  • Ventilators – If you have an HRV for your home, you should have at least 100 CFM for 2,000 square feet and another 50 for every 1,000 square feet of home size being ventilated.
  • Home Ventilators – The actual volume of CFM for ventilators depends on the type of ventilator being used. For example, a whole house ventilator needs upwards of 6,000 CFM for a 2,000 square foot home. Attic ventilators need 1,400 or more.

So, what does this mean for your Cressey home? It means in general that you need a lot of ventilation and that the best way to get it is through mechanical ventilation techniques combined with your air handler and ductwork.

Especially if you recently added insulation and weather proofing to your home but have not yet updated your ventilation, you might have a major air quality problem, so have a Cressey professional measure your home’s air flow as soon as possible.

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Check Out Our Blog for the Latest in HVAC Technology

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

Be sure to bookmark the Ace Air Conditioning blog for updates on the latest advances in HVAC technology.

We’ll feature money saving promotions here as well.

Call Ace Air Conditioning for all your Air Conditioning, Heating, Fireplace, Indoor Air Quality and Commercial HVAC needs.

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